1. 12:09 22nd Jul 2014

    Notes: 1868

    Reblogged from kaitmpayne

    1. Being able to say “I’m sorry” is a skill, and one that not a lot of people possess. Hone that skill. Apologizing shouldn’t be followed by “but here’s why I did it” or “and then you did this”. An apology is you taking responsibility for hurting someone else, not a notch on a scorecard in some bizarro battle of “Who’s Right?”
     
  2. 00:01 14th Jul 2014

    Notes: 1

    Reblogged from shunterk

    shunterk:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kNaVoibL0gw

    "The color is dependent on your skin tone, but it should look like you just thought of a world where women are sexually autonomous, and you’re like kinda embarrassed about it. That’s not real! Ha ha. Get that out of here…!"

     
  3. 13:47 10th Jul 2014

    Notes: 8

    Reblogged from kaitmpayne

    kaitmpayne:

    Weirdest mood

     
  4. 11:42 2nd Jul 2014

    Notes: 1163

    Reblogged from dailyotter

    image: Download

    dailyotter:

Otters Have a Sweet Little Kiss
Via Sometimes Zoo & Aquarium Views
     
  5. 18:59 25th Jun 2014

    Notes: 412221

    Reblogged from stephlehem

    840px:

    life hack: remember to compliment people on qualities other than their looks. remind them of their kindness, thoughtfulness, and intelligence. tell them about how powerful and capable they are.

    (Source: ellsworthsmelly)

     
  6. 13:57

    Notes: 285974

    Reblogged from mimesismama

    boo-and-kitty:

    You don’t need to buy me expensive things or take me out to dinner every night or even every weekend. I don’t need the world or want the world. I want the little things. If you push my hair out of face or rub my back. Or if you randomly kiss my cheek. Or text me randomly saying you miss me. Or if you make a tweet about me or post a picture of us on instagram. Then that’s all I care about. I want the little things. I care way more about that, than anything else.

    (Source: vernist)

     
  7. 22:18 23rd Jun 2014

    Notes: 83293

    Reblogged from stephlehem

    image: Download

    I see you one broccoli comic:
Credit: Super Glitch

    I see you one broccoli comic:

    The PorassiumCredit: Super Glitch

    (Source: pdlcomics)

     
  8. 12:17 22nd Jun 2014

    Notes: 797

    Reblogged from kaitmpayne

    image: Download

    
Don’t let what he wants eclipse what you need. He’s very dreamy, but he’s not the sun. You are.

I’ll always reblog this quote. Because holy fuck best moment of Grey’s possibly ever.

    Don’t let what he wants eclipse what you need. He’s very dreamy, but he’s not the sun. You are.

    I’ll always reblog this quote. Because holy fuck best moment of Grey’s possibly ever.

    (Source: greys-abc)

     
  9. 23:19 20th Jun 2014

    Notes: 27789

    Reblogged from feralrookie

    socimages:

Nope!
Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.
Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.
Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

    socimages:

    Nope!

    Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.

    By Lisa Wade, PhD

    A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.

    Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

    Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.

    Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.

    Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

     
  10. 13:37

    Notes: 951

    Reblogged from gifshows

    But real talk, this is why sex ed is so important.